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Neeson: Wife's Death Still Doesn't Feel Real

Written By andika jamanta on Rabu, 30 Juli 2014 | 20.48

Liam Neeson has spoken about the moment his wife Natasha Richardson died and how it still doesn't feel real.

The Taken and Schindler's List star has described having to switch off the actress' life support machine after she was involved in a skiing accident in Canada five years ago.

In an interview with Loaded magazine, Neeson said: "Her death was never real. It still kind of isn't."

The Irish actor said he still expects to hear her when the door opens in his house.

Liam Neeson Neeson has a very successful Hollywood career

Neeson revealed that he and his wife had made a pact that if they ended up in a vegetative state then they would turn off the machines.

It was thought at first that Richardson, 45, had just suffered a minor head injury when she fell in 2009. But her condition soon deteriorated.

"When I saw her and saw all these tubes and stuff that was my immediate thought, 'OK, these tubes have to go. She's gone'," he said.

The 62-year-old said sometimes his late wife's death hits him like a "wave" when he is working.

"You just get this profound feeling of instability," he said.

Neeson now lives in New York with the couple's two sons Micheal and Daniel.

Part of one of Britain's great theatrical dynasties, Richardson was the daughter of Oscar-winning actress Vanessa Redgrave and the late director Tony Richardson.

She was also the granddaughter of Sir Michael Redgrave and Rachel Kempson, the sister of actress Joely Richardson, and the niece of Lynn Redgrave.

Richardson married Neeson in 1994 after the pair met on the set of the film Nell.


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Ebola Cure 'A Long Way Off': Facts About Virus

A cure for the deadly ebola virus, which has killed hundreds of people in West Africa, is "a very long way off", an expert has told Sky News.

David Evans, a professor of virology at Warwick University, said ebola is the latest disease to be transmitted "very efficiently" because of international travel.

More than 670 people in Sierra Leone, Liberia, Guinea and Nigeria have fallen victim to the viral illness, which has a fatality rate of up to 90%.

Those with ebola will often be overcome by a sudden onset of fever, as well as weakness, muscle pain and headaches.

The body is then gripped by vomiting, diarrhoea, rashes, kidney and liver problems and bleeding.

Medical staff prepare to bring food to patients in an isolation area Medical staff bring food to patients in an isolation area in Sierra Leone

The time between infection and symptoms appearing is anything from two days to three weeks.

Ebola is spread through the direct contact with the blood, organs or other bodily fluids of those infected.

The liquid that bathes the eye and semen can transmit the disease, Prof Evans said.

Horeshoe bats are believed to be the natural host of the viral disease, he said.

"These bats transmit the virus between themselves, but periodically it then ends up in probably primates or other types of bushmeat which are then hunted by villagers and the virus is then transmitted from the sick animals to humans," he said.

Ebola deaths The latest outbreak is centred on four countries in west Africa

Transmission has also been documented through the handling of chimpanzees, gorillas and porcupines.

One of the reasons for the disease's rapid spread is a tradition at burial ceremonies for mourners to have direct contact with the body of the deceased.

"Therefore barrier methods that prevent that direct contact, including things like washing of hands and things like that provide a reasonable level of protection," he said.

Healthcare workers treating patients are particularly at risk.

Public Health England said in a risk assessment published earlier this month said that the current outbreak could increase the risk for Britons working in humanitarian and healthcare delivery.

Alex Crawford Ebola Virus In Liberia The first outbreak was recorded in 1976

But the threat to tourists, visitors and expatriates is still considered "very low if elementary precautions are followed".

Prof Evans said there had been "periodic outbreaks" of ebola since the first recorded instances in 1976, but this is the deadliest so far.

There were two simultaneous outbreaks in Nzara, Sudan and Yambuku, a village in the Democratic Republic of Congo located near the Ebola River.

Data from the World Health Organisation shows the previous deadliest outbreak was in the one in the DRC, when 280 out of 315 people infected died.

In the same country in 1995 another outbreak claimed 254 lives, with 315 patients infected.

In 2000, there were 425 cases in Uganda and 224 people died.


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Cobra Meeting As UK Doctors Warned Over Ebola

The Government's emergency committee is to discuss how to tackle the "new and emerging" threat of ebola, as doctors in Britain are put on alert to spot symptoms of the deadly disease.

The outbreak is the largest in history, with the virus killing more than 670 people in Sierra Leone, Liberia, Guinea and Nigeria since February.

Infection results from direct contact with the blood, bodily fluids and tissues of infected animals or people.

Chief Medical Officer Dame Sally Davies arrives at a Cobra meeting chaired by Foreign Secretary, Philip Hammond to discuss the current ebola outbreak.Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt arrives at a Cobra meeting chaired by Foreign Secretary, Philip Hammond to discuss the current ebola outbreak. Chief Medical Officer Dame Sally Davies and Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt

Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond has told Sky News that while there are no cases in the UK, Prime Minister David Cameron regards the disease as a "very serious threat".

"We are very much focused on it as a new and emerging threat which we need to deal with," Mr Hammond said.

A person from Birmingham was tested for ebola after returning from Africa, but the tests came back negative.

The man was tested earlier this week after reportedly travelling from Benin in Nigeria via Paris to the Midlands.

A map showing the UK and European flight routes to the countries affected by ebola. UK and European flight routes to the countries affected by ebola

Another man visited Charing Cross Hospital in west London after fearing he had the virus, but it was decided by doctors that he did not need an ebola test. 

Dr Brian McCloskey, director of global health at Public Health England (PHE), said the risk to British travellers and workers was low, but doctors needed to be vigilant for "unexplained illnesses" in those who have returned from the affected countries.

Dr McCloskey said: "The continuing increase in cases, especially in Sierra Leone, and the importation of a single case from Liberia to Nigeria is a cause for concern as it indicates the outbreak is not yet under control."

Those who experience symptoms such as fever, intense weakness, muscle pain, headache and a sore throat within three weeks of their return from such countries should "immediately seek medical assistance", Dr McCloskey said.

Medical staff prepare to bring food to patients in an isolation area Medical staff prepare to bring food to patients in an isolation area

The Government's chief scientific adviser, Sir Mark Walport, has told the Daily Telegraph that ebola was "potentially a major threat" to Britain due to the increasingly "interconnected" nature of the world.

British Airways, which flies to Sierra Leone and Nigeria, said in a statement it complies with guidance from local health authorities and will "continue to monitor the situation closely".

Cabin crew are advised to contact air traffic control if they see someone on board who they suspect could have the disease.

Ebola deaths Countries affected by the ebola outbreak

In 2012, a man with Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever, which is related to ebola, was flown from Glasgow Airport to London by the RAF to be treated at the Royal Free Hospital in north London.

A Department of Health spokesman said: "We are well-prepared to identify and deal with any potential cases of ebola, though there has never been a case in this country.

"Any patients with suspected symptoms can be diagnosed within 24 hours and they would also be isolated at a dedicated unit to keep the public safe."


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Four-Hour Lull In Gaza After UN School Hit

Israel has agreed to hold fire in Gaza for four hours after a night of heavy shelling left at least 43 people dead, including many at a UN school.

It said a four-hour ceasefire in certain areas of the coastal strip, approved for "humanitarian reasons", would last until 7pm local time (6pm GMT).

Hamas responded by saying the lull had "no value", with at least one rocket fired towards Israel from Gaza shortly after the truce came into force.

It comes after a school in Jebalya refugee camp, where aid workers say they are at "breaking point" helping some of the 200,000 people who have been displaced by the war, was hit around dawn.

A Palestinian man inspects the damage at a UN school at the Jabalia refugee camp in the northern Gaza Strip Damage to the school in Jebalya that doubles up as a shelter for refugees

At least 19 people, including a young child, were killed, many of them as they slept.

Adbel Karim al Masamha, who came to Jebalya with his family to seek refuge, said: "People were martyred before our eyes. They were dismembered."

Another refugee, Haleema Ghabin, added: "No place is safe, neither homes nor schools. We are defenceless."

Jebalya was the second UN-run school to be hit in the past week, with a complex in Beit Hanoun struck last Thursday, killing at least 15 people.

A map showing the locations of refugee camps on the Gaza Strip Jebalya is one of eight UN refugee camps in Gaza

An Israeli defence spokesman said militants near the school fired mortars at soldiers before the attack.

The UN Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA) said it warned Israel "17 times" the building was being used by refugees, although it also confirmed other schools had been used to store weapons.

On the 23rd day of the conflict, Israeli TV said progress was being made to achieve a peace deal, with a Palestinian delegation expected to arrive in Egypt for discussions.

Earlier, thick, black smoke could be seen rising from blazing fuel tanks at Gaza's only power station, which was knocked out on the bloodiest day of the conflict so far.

The aftermath of a rocket attack on Gaza City Sky's Sherine Tadros saw the aftermath of a rocket attack in Gaza City

At least 128 Palestinians were killed as Israel sought to destroy what it called Hamas "terror sites" with heavy fire from the air, land and sea.

Meanwhile, the leader of Hamas' military wing, Mohammed Deif, issued a rare statement, saying there will be no end to the fighting until the blockade of Gaza is lifted.

According to UNRWA, about 10% of Palestinians - more than 200,000 people - have been displaced by fighting.

The figure is triple that seen at the peak of the 2008/9 conflict, with the organisation warning all of its camps are now full.

House destroyed in Rafah, Gaza Hundreds of homes have been razed to the ground in Gaza

Justine Greening, the international development secretary, described the situation as "dire", as the UK pledged an extra £3m to provide a month of emergency food for more than 300,000 people.

More than 1,200 Palestinians, most of them civilians, have been killed since the start of the offensive on July 8.

On the Israeli side, 53 soldiers and three civilians have died.

A poll by Tel Aviv University found 95% of Israel's Jewish majority feel the conflict is justified.


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MH17 Crash Investigators Stopped By Fighting

Written By andika jamanta on Selasa, 29 Juli 2014 | 20.48

Where And Why Are Flights Banned?

Updated: 12:21pm UK, Tuesday 29 July 2014

The shooting down of Malaysia Airlines flight MH17 has increased debate about whether aircraft should be allowed to fly over battlegrounds.

As aviation industry chiefs from around the world meet in Montreal to discuss how to avoid a repeat of the disaster, Sky News looks at where no-fly zones exist and why they were introduced.

:: Ukraine

All aircraft are banned from the part of Ukrainian airspace immediately over Donetsk, unless the pilot has been given special permission.

The shooting down of Malaysia Airlines flight MH17 indicates "the potential for continued hazardous activities", the Federal Aviation Authority warns.

Pilots who are forced to fly over Donetsk because of an emergency must explain why they took the route they did within 10 days.

:: North Korea

All aircraft are banned from flying over North Korea, unless the pilot has been given special permission.

In its latest advice to pilots, the Federal Aviation Authority says: "North Korea has a history of launching short-range and medium-range ballistic missiles with no warning."

Pilots who are forced to fly over North Korea because of an emergency must explain why they took the route they did within 10 days.

:: Iraq

All US aircraft must fly at a height of 18,000ft (5,486m) or above over Iraq, unless the pilot has been given special permission.

The Federal Aviation Authority says heightened tensions and instability in the country "have increased the threat to civil aircraft" and warns the Iraqi military has a "wide range of sophisticated weapons", including surface-to-air missiles, which could be used to attack planes.

Pilots who are forced to fly over Iraq because of an emergency must explain why they took the route they did within 10 days.

:: Libya

All US aircraft are banned from the area of airspace known as the Tripoli Flight Information Region (FIR), which covers Libya, as well as sections of Niger and Chad, unless the pilot has been given special permission.

The Federal Aviation Authority has "safety and national security concerns" regarding flights in the area and warns airports may be damaged and navigation systems unavailable.

It also says the "proliferation of air defence weapons ... and the presence of military operations, including aerial bombardments and unplanned flights" pose a potential hazard.

Pilots who are forced to fly through the Tripoli FIR because of an emergency must tell the FAA why they took the route they did.

:: Ethiopia

All US aircraft are banned from flying over Ethiopia and the region of airspace immediately to the north, unless the pilot has been given special permission.

Aircraft which cross into Ethiopian airspace while taking off or landing at Mandera, Kenya, "may be fired upon by Ethiopian forces", according to the Federal Aviation Authority.

"Operators considering flights to northeastern Kenya should familiarise themselves with the current situation," it adds.

Pilots who are forced to fly over Ethiopia because of an emergency must explain why they took the route they did within 10 days.

:: Somalia

All US aircraft must fly at a height of 18,000ft (5,486m) or above over Somalia, unless the pilot has been given special permission from the Federal Aviation Authority.

Flights above 18,000ft are allowed only with the permission of Somali authorities.

Pilots who are forced to fly over Somalia because of an emergency must explain why they took the route they did within 10 days.


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US Doctor Stricken With Ebola 'Is Terrified'

Africa Battles To Stop Deadly Spread Of Ebola

Updated: 9:34pm UK, Wednesday 02 July 2014

By Alex Crawford, Special Correspondent, In Liberia

The worst Ebola outbreak ever is spreading and will almost certainly extend across West Africa unless there is cross-country co-operation and urgent international assistance.

The porous borders between Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone has meant the disease is not being contained and now risks spreading even further.

Health workers at the epicentre, where the borders of the three countries meet, have made an urgent appeal through Sky News for immediate international help to try to control the virus.

Philip Azumah, the Foya district health officer, said: "We need help now, or the virus will spread and kill more people."

It is difficult to determine exactly how many people have already died from the disease given the cross-border contamination and lack of accounting.

But it is already clear there are many more deaths than any previous outbreak.

Aid organisation Doctors Without Borders has already said it is the largest outbreak on record, with the highest number of deaths.

Across the three countries, more than 400 have died in this latest outbreak, with no sign of the disease being halted.

And for the first time the disease has spread to highly populated areas including cities such as Guinea's capital, Conakry.

At one of the high-risk infection centres set up in Foya, in Liberia, the medics insisted we, like them, took extreme precautions.

This included wearing two layers of protective head-to-toe clothing featuring one waterproof all-in-one outfit, face and head masks, double gloves, thick plastic aprons, sturdy goggles and rubber boots.

Among the victims was a nurse who contracted Ebola after caring for a person who later died from the virus.

Nurse Elizabeth Smith was lying on a bed next to another nurse who had contracted Ebola from the same patient they had both treated.

But Ms Smith was significantly weaker than her co-worker. She did not raise her head as we entered and her bed was soaked in blood.

Neither woman had realised they were treating a patient with Ebola, so had taken none of the precautions their colleagues were now taking.

Two of them sprayed Ms Smith with disinfectant, down her legs, her feet, her hands and arms as they stood arms-length away in their head-to-toe protective clothing and visors. Gingerly, they took her arms and helped her to her feet, before escorting her down the tent corridor to the high-risk area.

Here, every patient is a confirmed Ebola case and the odds are that 90% of them will die.

The frightening deadliness of Ebola, plus the ignorance around it and the lack of a cure, has thrown the medical staff in this area into a panic.

Francis Forndia, administrator for Foya-Borma Hospital, where medical staff have died after treating victims, told us his workers simply fled after nurses began dying.

"It is hard to get them to return, but we have managed to persuade some to come back by explaining to them how needed they are," he said.

Mr Azumah is co-ordinating the health battle against Ebola in this area. He tells me the first recent outbreak in Liberia was in March, when an infected woman travelled to Foya from Guinea.

She died two days after being admitted to the sole and tiny hospital in Foya. By the time of her death, she had infected eleven people in hospital alone.

Two of them were nurses who went on to die. The remaining nine somehow managed to survive.

Then Liberia went a solid three weeks without an incident and believed they were clear - until the end of May.

This time, a woman from Sierra Leone, probably out of fear, gave misleading information about where she had come from.

She told investigators she was local, which was true, but did not mention she had in fact spent some time in an infected area of Sierra Leone.

This time the consequences were much more widespread. She had infected a stream of people, six of whom died.

They are still trying to trace all those she may have been in contact with.

There have since been other outbreaks in Voinjamma and the Liberian capital, Monrovia, while Guinea and Sierra Leone continue to register deaths, too.

Mr Azumah said: "In our culture, it is the habit to wash the dead body, look after it for a week in the home, kiss and touch it, even eat meals with the dead body - and we believe this has led to the virus spreading.

"Also people are keeping the illnesses and deaths secret if they suspect Ebola."

By alerting the authorities to possible Ebola, people risk being ostracised by their communities.

There is even a fear among these poverty stricken communities that the visiting health workers are spreading the virus.

But what seems significant is that, in Liberia at least, one of the poorest countries in the world, they are largely coping with this virulent disease on their own - with very little outside help evident.


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Gaza: '100 Palestinians Killed In One Day'

Gaza Conflict 'Like A Never-Ending Horror Film'

Updated: 1:43pm UK, Tuesday 29 July 2014

By Sherine Tadros, Middle East Correspondent, in Gaza City

"Stay safe," people keep telling us.

"Where?" I always reply.

One of the harsh realities of this war is that there seem to be no red lines or boundaries.

People here are locked inside a tiny, cramped territory while the Israeli army bombs their homes, businesses, schools and hospitals.

Some 23,160 buildings have been damaged in the past three weeks, including 560 houses that were specifically targeted, according to the Health Ministry.

Most of the time there is no electricity, so at night you can only listen to what's happening around you in the dark.

Parents watch as their children die, children watch as their parents die - it's like a horror film.

The hardest part is how to convey the emotion and explain the events you are witnessing to people who live thousands of miles away and have likely never been to Gaza.

How do you do the story justice, remaining calm and fair?

Journalists are obsessed with the idea of balance, but what throws us off is that this is not an equal battle.

Israel says it is defending its civilians from rockets indiscriminately fired at them and underground tunnels used to infiltrate and kill soldiers.

Hamas says it is defending their civilians from an Israeli imposed siege that has strangled Gaza and affects every part of daily life.

The sad reality is that this war will likely end with Israel keeping Gaza under a blockade, which means Hamas will continue to resist - if not with rockets then tunnels, if not with tunnels then something else.

And if it's not Hamas it will be another group. The violence will continue as long as there is a cause.

Covering this war has been just as devastating as in 2008/9, the last time Israel launched a ground assault and I was inside Gaza.

Back then, people felt they were paying the price for a battle between Hamas and Israel.

This time, after seven years of living under siege, many sound hopeless and support Hamas (they call it "the resistance") because they feel there is no other way to end the misery they are living in.

My parents tell me stories of going on holiday to Gaza when they were young.

It has a beautiful coastline and when the drones and jets are quiet you can hear the waves crashing on the beach.

But the last few years of the blockade have been especially tough and Gaza is now a ghetto of 1.8 million people with many living in refugee camps surrounded by bombed out buildings.

Yesterday, at a UN school turned shelter, a woman asked me where I was from.

"Egypt," I replied, expecting her to lecture me about the country's complicity in the siege and how much she hates Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al Sisi.

But instead she said in a strong, sad voice: "Take me back with you."

It's simple really: people in Gaza, like elsewhere in the world, just want a chance to live with dignity.


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Gaza Conflict 'Is Like An Endless Horror Film'

By Sherine Tadros, Middle East Correspondent, in Gaza City

"Stay safe," people keep telling us.

"Where?" I always reply.

One of the harsh realities of this war is that there seem to be no red lines or boundaries.

People here are locked inside a tiny, cramped territory while the Israeli army bombs their homes, businesses, schools and hospitals.

A Palestinian man reacts as rescue workers search for victims under the rubble of a house in Khan Younis in the southern Gaza Strip A Palestinian man stands by a house witnesses said was destroyed by Israel

Some 23,160 buildings have been damaged in the past three weeks, including 560 houses that were specifically targeted, according to the Health Ministry.

Most of the time there is no electricity, so at night you can only listen to what's happening around you in the dark.

Parents watch as their children die, children watch as their parents die - it's like a horror film.

The hardest part is how to convey the emotion and explain the events you are witnessing to people who live thousands of miles away and have likely never been to Gaza.

Smoke rises after an Israeli tank shelling in the northern Gaza Strip Smoke rises from the Gaza Strip after an Israeli shelling

How do you do the story justice, remaining calm and fair?

Journalists are obsessed with the idea of balance, but what throws us off is that this is not an equal battle.

Israel says it is defending its civilians from rockets indiscriminately fired at them and underground tunnels used to infiltrate and kill soldiers.

Hamas says it is defending their civilians from an Israeli imposed siege that has strangled Gaza and affects every part of daily life.

Rockets reportedly fired after the cease fire into Israel from Gaza Smoke trails from rockets fired towards Israel from the Gaza Strip

The sad reality is that this war will likely end with Israel keeping Gaza under a blockade, which means Hamas will continue to resist - if not with rockets then tunnels, if not with tunnels then something else.

And if it's not Hamas it will be another group. The violence will continue as long as there is a cause.

Covering this war has been just as devastating as in 2008/9, the last time Israel launched a ground assault and I was inside Gaza.

Back then, people felt they were paying the price for a battle between Hamas and Israel.

This time, after seven years of living under siege, many sound hopeless and support Hamas (they call it "the resistance") because they feel there is no other way to end the misery they are living in.

My parents tell me stories of going on holiday to Gaza when they were young.

It has a beautiful coastline and when the drones and jets are quiet you can hear the waves crashing on the beach.

But the last few years of the blockade have been especially tough and Gaza is now a ghetto of 1.8 million people with many living in refugee camps surrounded by bombed out buildings.

Yesterday, at a UN school turned shelter, a woman asked me where I was from.

"Egypt," I replied, expecting her to lecture me about the country's complicity in the siege and how much she hates Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al Sisi.

But instead she said in a strong, sad voice: "Take me back with you."

It's simple really: people in Gaza, like elsewhere in the world, just want a chance to live with dignity.


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'Rivers Of Hail' As Freak Storm Sweeps Coast

Written By andika jamanta on Senin, 28 Juli 2014 | 20.48

A freak summer storm has brought chaos to the south coast of England with lightning, floods and hailstones and a power cut on the railway lines.

Forecasters said a "deeply unstable airmass" had brought with it the risk of heavy, thundery showers across East Anglia, the South East and London throughout the day. The Met Office said nearly half a month's worth of rain fell in an hour in some areas.

Brighton storm The scene in Brighton after hail and torrential rain swept in

London Fire Brigade rescued two women from a car which in flood water in South Ruislip, northwest London.

Firefighters also rescued five people from three neighbouring houses which were flooded in Thaxted, Essex. One family remained on the first floor of their home while crews pumped water from the property after flood water affected the electrics.

Summer weather July 28th Lighting strikes Hove, Sussex, taken from the bedroom of Jon Hughes

Commuters in West Sussex braved torrential rain and hailstones as they struggled to work, though the main Brighton to London line was unaffected.

People in Brighton, Hove and Worthing who posted pictures on social media websites described seeing cars submerged and people taking shelter in the town hall.  

Summer weather July 28th Commuters were left stranded after the south-coast line was closed

Network Rail said electrical supply problems had been caused by a lightning strike, near Hove, during the morning, causing delays of up to 30 minutes to trains between Worthing and Hove/Brighton.

South West Trains said Woking-bound trains would not be calling at Esher, Hersham or Walton-on-Thames because of flooding.

A spokesman for East Sussex Fire and Rescue told Sky News they received some 300 calls from the public.

Flooding in Worthing, West Sussex A street in Worthing which became impassable

Richard Fowler said: "The control room started receiving calls at six o'clock this morning. We have had 300 calls so far in the south coast area from Brighton and Hove.

"The power to the track has had to be isolated because the tracks are flooded, and we have sent one of our high pumps over to assist with that.

"People are phoning and saying they have flooded basements which are affecting electrics. We did not expect this kind of extreme weather this morning. There are large hailstones on the ground. It is almost like winter."

Worthing storm Worthing Station was closed after flood water poured into the underpass

Hove resident Adam Batchelor emailed a picture to Sky News of the road outside his home in Hove. "The basement flats flooded and people evacuated to the town hall," he said. "Thankfully I stayed away last night!" he said.

Laurence Hill wrote on Twitter: "Used to be roads. Now rivers of hail. Never seen anything like it."

Summer weather July 28th Hailstones that fell across Sussex

The Environment Agency issued a flood warning - meaning flooding is expected - for the Kidbrooke stream at Forest Row, East Sussex.

It said: "Heavy showers will bring a chance of some localised surface water flooding issues across parts of Sussex and Kent this afternoon.

Summer weather July 28th Hail and slush gave some streets the appearance of being hit by snow

"Further heavy showers are expected from around dawn tomorrow across much of southeast England which may result in some surface water flooding, especially in urbanised areas."


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Crashing Plane Kills Dad Walking With Daughter

A father has been killed and his daughter left seriously injured after a small plane crash-landed on a beach in Florida.

The man was walking along the sand in Venice when the aircraft, a 1972 Piper Cherokee, came down.

The pair have been named as 36-year-old Ommy Irizarry and nine-year-old Oceana.

On his Facebook page just hours before the tragedy on Sunday, Mr Irizarry wrote that he was celebrating his ninth wedding anniversary with his wife, Rebecca.

Ommy Irizarry. Pic: Facebook. Ommy Irizarry

Witness Zack Arceneaux told reporters at the scene: "The dad looked very bad. They were performing CPR on him he had blood on his face.

"It looked like he wasn't breathing at all."

Oceana has been taken to a children's hospital in St Petersburg "and is believed to be in critical condition," said Wendy Rose, of the Sarasota County Sheriff's Office.

She added that neither the pilot nor his passenger, named as 57-year-old Karl Kokomoor and 60-year-old David Theen, were hurt in the incident.

Venice Airport officials had told the sheriff's office that the pilot was going to attempt a beach landing after signalling he was in distress and was unable to make it to the airfield.

Ms Rose was quoted by CBS as saying: "He knew he couldn't make it back to the airport and was going to try to land on the beach. And he did land at the edge of the water on the beach."

The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating.

Spokeswoman Kathleen Bergen told the Associated Press the plane reportedly lost power but had no details.


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